71.6 F
Ocean City

Taking a stroll around Downtown Ocean City

If you are in Ocean City this week, you may notice a couple of changes as you drive down Coastal Highway. The speed limit, normally 40 mph through North Ocean City, has been reduced to 30 mph, and Downtown, the speed limit has also been reduced. This is due to the expected, unauthorized H2Oi Pop-Up Rally.  It is reasonable to expect heavier than usual traffic, noise and strict enforcement of vehicle laws during the week and weekend.

Many visitors, when thinking of Downtown Ocean City, think only of the  Boardwalk. But there is more to see and walk around in Downtown if you take a step away from the Boardwalk. We have put together a few pictures that have been taken over the years of downtown Ocean City, minus the Boardwalk. There’s old historic buildings, beautifully cared for homes, statues, sculptures, lanes, well tended gardens, and views. So, next time you are in town, leave the Boardwalk behind one afternoon, and wander the streets and lanes downtown for a different look and feel to Downtown Ocean City. 

The White Marlin sculpture at the entrance to Ocean City from Rt50

Great place to sit and watch the world go by on 6th Street and Philadelphia Ave

 Wilmington Lane at 10th street, one of the quieter lanes of Downtown Ocean City

The impressive City Hall on 3rd Street and Baltimore Avenue, built in 1915

There are some beautiful houses in the Downtown area.

Flowers in bloom on a Downtown lane.

The Ocean City Life-Saving Station, built in 1891. Interesting place to walk through too.

There’s still evidence of old Ocean City if you look close enough. This building is on Wilmington Lane between 7th and 8th Street

Don’t forget there’s a Bayside!

 

Blossoms by the City Hall. The building was used by Worcester County as a school for children from Ocean City, and elementary levels used the school well into the 1960s.

The El Galeon Tall Ship visiting  the Bayside Boardwalk on Chicago Avenue

View of Downtown from the new Cambria Hotel

The Inlet Indian. This monument, representing the Assateague Indian, was sculpted by Peter Toth in 1976

Impressive, well taken care of downtown homes

View of the Watch Tower, at the Ocean City Life Saving Station. The tower was erected in 1934-35 after the storm of 1933 cut the Inlet.

Some areas of downtown feel like the village Ocean City once was.

Love the flowers here on 12th street and Baltimore Avenue!

 

The Route 50 Draw Bridge. It’s always fun to watch it go up to let the big boats through.

South Baltimore Avenue at Dorchester Street

By Sunset Park and as its name suggests, a great spot for watching the sun set.

Lots of care has gone into making this yard a delight to look at on Baltimore Ave. between 12th and 13th streets 

Although strictly part of the Boardwalk, it’s always a nice to change to stroll around the Inlet Village where there’s a collections of shops and boutiques that overlook the Inlet, and great views of Assateague Island.

12th Street and Baltimore Avenue

Quite the foliage on this house on 11th Street!

Looking north up South Baltimore Avenue

Henry’s Hotel on South Division Street, the last surviving hotel to serve only African-American visitors, purchased in 1926 by Charles and Louisa Henry.

Cottage on St Louis Avenue

A walk over the Rt 50 Bridge – kids love it! Leave the car at the Park and Ride in West Ocean
City and enjoy the day without the hassles, and expense, of parking!

The corner of 7th street and Baltimore Avenue

Assateague Guide

Everything you want to know about the Ocean City boardwalk.
Shop, Eat, Drink, People Watch, Amusements, Bike & Scooter rentals, more...

Follow Oceancity.com

208,023FansLike
29,939FollowersFollow
1,898FollowersFollow
8,819FollowersFollow
329SubscribersSubscribe

Latest articles

Similar articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: OceanCity.com, 4 Bay St., Suite D, Berlin, MD, 21811, http://www.oceancity.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact