Ocean City Oddities: Final Days at 65th Street Slide ‘N Ride

Ocean City Oddities: Final Days at 65th Street Slide ‘N Ride

It has been nearly a decade since the 65th Street Slide ‘N Ride witnessed its last smile or heard its last laugh after closing its doors for good in September of 2008. Originally opening for the summer of 1972, the mid-town water slide was believed to be the oldest slide in the state of Maryland at the time of its closing. After 36 years of operating the business complete with the iconic hilltop water slide, miniature golf course, water boats, batting cage, basketball court, and ample rides and amusements for children, the owner had decided to turn in the keys and enjoy retirement. Most of the equipment on the land was sold privately, and during its final few days in existence, the property was merely the shell of what it once was. Take a look back to September of 2008 during this memorable and iconic OC landmark’s final days.

65th Street Slide ‘N Ride was located three blocks north of Rt. 90, a half-block off of Coastal Highway behind the 64th Street Shopping Center, and only a stone’s throw away from Ocean Playland Amusement Park. (Early 1980s)
One of many maps made available to visitors exploring the grounds.
Vintage photo of families enjoying the sights and sounds of the park.
The park’s sign as seen from Coastal Highway, originally belonging to Ocean Playland Amusement Park and later repurposed for the Slide ‘N Ride.
The park’s three iconic blue water slides nestled into the hillside. Slides included the Kiddie Slide, Sui-Slide, and Katie Slide.
One of many small splash pools around the park.
Changing rooms and another view of the hill.
Remnants of what was once a thriving fleet of 19 bumper boats.
Another group of kiddie boats. Children between the ages of 2 and 7 were permitted on these.
Although miniature golf was once a mainstay, it now sits quietly waiting to be hauled in to storage.
Additional holes of the nautical-themed course.
Children would often be seen playing in the course’s center gazebo.
A children’s basketball court sits abandoned. Back then, the park coined this activity “Bank Shot Basketball.”
In the distance remains the skeleton of a batting cage. The park had five cages operating at one point.
Pieces of the landscape are piled high ready to be taken to the dump.
An eerie reminder of some of the park’s once-great features.
Closed for good.
One of many amusements available back then.
As the water tower watches over the abandoned hill, we say our final goodbyes. In due time, the site would be demolished and turned into a parking and storage lot for the city.

Photography by Brandon Seidl

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