Ocean City Expects First Snow of 2018, Resort Area Under Winter Storm Warning

Ocean City Expects First Snow of 2018, Resort Area Under Winter Storm Warning

From the Town of Ocean City:

Ocean City, Maryland – (January 3, 2018):  Ocean City is under a Winter Storm Warning, beginning in the afternoon hours today, January 3, until 1 p.m. tomorrowJanuary 4.  According to the National Weather Service in Wakefield, VA, Ocean City will experience snow and moderate wind gusts.  The projected snow will begin late this afternoon and into Thursday morning.

Snowfall accumulations are expected to reach between 4 to 8 inches, with winds averaging 15 to 20 miles per hour and gusts reaching 45 miles per hour.  Due to the combination of snow, gusty winds and very cold temperatures, hazardous driving conditions are likely tonight and Thursday. Travel is strongly discouraged late tonight and during the storm tomorrow morning.

The Town of Ocean City’s Winter Storm Plan is in effect and the Emergency Management personnel are continuing to monitor the storm.  Crews have started to pretreat roadways and will begin plowing when the snow accumulates.

As temperatures continue to drop and conditions of the bay change, the Ocean City Fire Department (OCFD) is reminding residents and visitors about the dangers of ice.  While winter can be an exciting time of year for the outdoors type, a frozen body of water has inherent dangers which can occur regardless of how strong and thick the ice appears.

The OCFD is reminding citizens that ice on the bay, ponds, lakes and lagoons is unsafe.  “Each year hundreds of people are injured in ice water accidents,” said Ocean City Fire Department Lieutenant and Water Rescue Commander, Darrick Elliott. “Many think that because the body of water has been frozen for a few days, they can “skate” or play on the ice.  It is important to understand that even though the ice may look strong and safe, there is always the danger of falling through the ice and into frigid water.”

Parents are encouraged to talk to their children about the dangers of ice.  “Walking and playing on ice is inviting and appears to be fun but it is important that children understand the dangers associated with playing on ice,” Baker continued.  “It’s important for children to know that there is no such thing as 100% safe ice. No ice is safe ice.”

If you are unsure if a frozen area of the bay, pond or lake is safe, please contact the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1-877-620-8DNR before allowing any activity to take place on the ice. For tips on staying safe during winter storms and cold weather, visit: https://www.ready.gov/winter-weather.  

From the National Weather Service:

…WINTER STORM WARNING NOW IN EFFECT FROM 7 PM THIS EVENING TO
1 PM EST THURSDAY…

*WHAT…Heavy snow expected. Plan on difficult travel 
conditions, including during the morning commute on Thursday. 
Total snow accumulations of 4 to 8 inches are expected.

*WHERE…Portions of southeast Maryland and eastern Virginia.

*WHEN…From 7 PM this evening to 1 PM EST Thursday.

*ADDITIONAL DETAILS…Be prepared for significant reductions in
visibility at times.

*PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

A winter storm warning for snow means severe winter weather
conditions are expected. If you must travel, keep an extra 
flashlight, food and water in your vehicle in case of an
emergency. The latest road conditions for the state you are
calling from can be obtained by calling 511. 

How to prepare and stay safe

Stay indoors during the storm.
Prolonged exposure to cold can cause hypothermia.

Walk and drive carefully on icy sidewalks and roads.
Many injuries and accidents are caused by slippery conditions.

Before driving, let someone know your destination, route, and expected time of arrival.
If your car gets stuck, it’ll be easier to find you.

If you lose feeling and color in your nose, ears, hands, or feet, cover the exposed area, avoid rubbing your skin, and seek medical help immediately.
You may have frostbite.

When shoveling snow, take breaks and lift lighter loads.
Working too hard can lead to heart attacks.

Stay dry.
Wet clothes make you lose body heat, increasing your risk of hypothermia.

Photo from WBOC

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