Ocean City is Taking Precautions but is Open for Business & Pleasure

Ocean City is Taking Precautions but is Open for Business & Pleasure

Ocean City is Taking Precautions but is Open for Business & Pleasure

Ocean City, Maryland
Aerial shot of the Ocean City, Maryland beach

As reported earlier, Ocean City and its businesses are open. The cancellation of large events were part of the precautions taken to ensure health and safety. Businesses, beach, and boardwalk are all open in Ocean City, Maryland for those that want to get away. Ocean City’s expansive beaches and nature are ready for your stroll, jog, or sit.

On Wednesday of this week, the Mayor of Ocean City sent out a statement to ensure that health and safety of all people both residents and visitors was the priority of Ocean City. To continue communications and further awareness, The Town of Ocean City has set up a page on their site to keep residents and travelers up to date about the coronavirus, and how Ocean City is dealing with the situation. This link has specific tabs to give you information on:

  • COVID-19
  • What OCMD is doing
  • Updates/Cancellations
  • Links

See this link to understand more about the disease, how it spreads, prevention, and the actions being made during this time:

Coronavirus Information

The page is a great resource to know how to mange through this time. For travelers the below recommendations may seem like typical routine, but are being reiterated for everyone’s safety.

CDC Travel Advisory for Coronavirus

While traveling to Ocean City or elsewhere please use these practices:

  • Perform routine environmental cleaning:
    • Routinely clean all frequently touched surfaces steering wheel, countertops, and doorknobs. Use the cleaning agents that are usually used in these areas and follow the directions on the label.
    • No additional disinfection beyond routine cleaning is recommended at this time.
    • Carry disposable wipes so that commonly used surfaces (for example, doorknobs, keyboards, remote controls, desks) can be wiped down.
  • Before traveling to take certain steps:
    • Check the CDC’s Traveler’s Health Notices for the latest guidance and recommendations for each area to which you will travel. Specific travel information for travelers going to and returning from China, and information for aircrew, can be found at on the CDC website.
    • Check yourself for symptoms of acute respiratory illness before starting travel and notify their supervisor and stay home if they are sick.

Ocean City Traveler Precautions

CLEANING AND DISINFECTION GUIDANCE FROM THE CDC

click here

Other Cautionary Practices that again may seem routine, but are being listed to keep everyone safe (from the CDC):

Clean your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid close contact

Take Steps to Protect Others

Stay home if you’re sick

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Wear a facemask if you are sick

  • If you are sick:  You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick.
  • If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.

Clean and disinfect

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

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