BRUISED BUT NOT BROKEN

NANCY POWELL ¦ Staff Writer

 Route 50 was open only to emergency vehicles Monday, as Hurricane Sandy brought with her a large amount of rain that flooded the downtown area. PHOTO COURTESY ROBERT KORB JR., WORCESTER COUNTY DEPUTY FIRE MARSHAL Route 50 was open only to emergency vehicles Monday, as Hurricane Sandy brought with her a large amount of rain that flooded the downtown area.PHOTO COURTESY ROBERT KORB JR., WORCESTER COUNTY DEPUTY FIRE MARSHALWORCESTER COUNTY

Residents throughout Worcester County started picking up the debris Tuesday that had been left behind by Hurricane Sandy, but compared to other areas, damage was slight.

County officials lifted the state of emergency and closed all county shelters Tuesday when it was clear that Sandy was no longer a threat. Residents who evacuated were authorized to return to their homes, but in some areas, roadways remained impassable because of standing water, fallen trees or other debris left behind by Sandy as she intensified and blew north.

During the storm, Worcester County Public Works crews worked until the winds reached a sustained force of 40 mph and went back out again after the winds died down.

After Sandy had come and gone, roads that remained impassable included the southern section of Route 113 south of Snow Hill, which was closed in both directions because of high water and the roadway at the Route 12 bridge in Snow Hill, also because of high water.

 While the sky looks menacing, the worst was over when this photo of Ocean City was taken Tuesday from Route 50. PHOTO COURTESY GINA WHALEY While the sky looks menacing, the worst was over when this photo of Ocean City was taken Tuesday from Route 50.PHOTO COURTESY GINA WHALEYA sinkhole on Route 346 between Route 610 and Hall Road near Whaleyville caused a closure that is expected to last several days while a 70-inch pipe is repaired.

Bud Church, president of the Worcester

County Commissioners, had minor damage at his West Ocean City residence. A tree fell on his house. A number of houses in the Cape Isle of Wight area had water inside and some trees toppled to the ground because of a combination of wind and the wet ground.

The situation in South Point was worse.

“Three people lost parts of their property,” Church said.

 A pontoon boat drifted away during the storm and came to a stop in vegetation alongside Old Landing Road in north Ocean City. OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL A pontoon boat drifted away during the storm and came to a stop in vegetation alongside Old Landing Road in north Ocean City.OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELLOne property owner also lost his entire septic system. Piers and docks were also demolished in the South Point area.

During the storm, 143 people were sheltered at Stephen Decatur High School, 68 people and 45 pets stayed at Stephen Decatur Middle School, 15 people stayed at Snow Hill High School and 77 people and two pets stayed at Pocomoke High School. Two pets stayed at Animal Control. Altogether, the county provided shelter for 305 people and 49 pets.

The county Health Department set up an emergency hotline, but discontinued it Tuesday afternoon at 5 p.m. Public Works crews worked during the bad weather and immediately afterward, but many county employees were off work Monday and Tuesday and could stay off work Wednesday because liberal leave was in effect. Schools were also closed for three days.

 A wayward personal watercraft and an outboard motor boat rest in back yards of residences on Jamestown Road on Wednesday, following days of high winds and heavy rain brought on by Hurricane Sandy. OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL A wayward personal watercraft and an outboard motor boat rest in back yards of residences on Jamestown Road on Wednesday, following days of high winds and heavy rain brought on by Hurricane Sandy.OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELLAs Assateague Island National Seashore, camping closed Saturday at 11 a.m. and the park closed Sunday at noon and was scheduled to remain closed at least through Tuesday. Then park personnel expected to assess when it could reopen. They needed to determine the condition of the Verrazano Bridge to Assateague.

In Ocean Pines on Tuesday morning, residents were asked to remain in their homes for a few more hours. Crews were assessing damage at daybreak that day. The wind advisory was still in effect and residents were warned that trees could still fall because of the soggy ground conditions. Abnormally high water levels were still evident.

Initial evaluations showed buildings and other structures held up well during Sandy. The Clubs, Aquatics and Recreation and Parks remained closed Tuesday, but Ocean Pines crews removed more than 30 trees from the roadways. Residents were advised to take their storm debris to the Public Works facility near the South Fire Station. Only yard debris is acceptable.

Ocean Pines General Manager Bob Thompson said volunteers assisted the employees before, during and after the store.

“We will be back up and running at full speed tomorrow,” Thompson said in an email message to residents.

In Ocean Pines, which is served by Choptank Electric Cooperative, not a single residence lost electricity during the duration of the storm.

Elsewhere in the county, 2,264 Choptank customers had outages as of 10:15 a.m. Tuesday morning. The cooperative expected to have power restored by late that day to some areas and expected to restore power to the other areas by Wednesday morning.

In Berlin, some residents lost power twice, once for two hours and once for two-and-a-half hours.

At the peak of the storm, more than 71,000 customers of Delmarva Power were out of service. As of 11 a.m. Wednesday, slightly more than 8,600 customers in Maryland and Delaware remained without power.

“We were very fortunate in Berlin,” said Councilwoman Lisa Hall, who was one of the Berlin residents who lost power, on Tuesday. “We had a few limbs down, and older trees down, but they didn’t fall on houses. No one was injured and I think we made out very well.”

Hall rode around town to check out the situation first-hand.

“We had flooding in the usual areas, but it wasn’t as bad a it has been,” she said.

Areas flooded during the day Monday and then the water receded. When high tide returned, the water level did not get as high as it had during the previous high tide.

Flooding, Hall said, was worse in August when she had 13 inches of rain in her yard in eight hours. During Sandy, she had 10.5 inches of rain, but it was during a longer period of time, so the effect was not damaging.

The town of Berlin cancelled its Monday recycling collection and rescheduled it for Monday, Nov. 5. It also cancelled the Tuesday trash collection and rescheduled it for Wednesday, Oct. 31.

Ocean Pines, which is served by Choptank Electric Cooperative, did not have any power outages.

On Gum Point Road in Taylorville, resident Charlotte Powell walked down the road to check for damage and there was little, if any, damage to see, although she did not survey the entire length of the road because of high water. She said a tree fell on a shed and water was in yards, but that was about the extent of the damage. Water reached the deck on one house, but did not get into the house.

“We were very lucky,” she said.

BRUISED BUT NOT BROKEN

NANCY POWELL ¦ Staff Writer

 Route 50 was open only to emergency vehicles Monday, as Hurricane Sandy brought with her a large amount of rain that flooded the downtown area. PHOTO COURTESY ROBERT KORB JR., WORCESTER COUNTY DEPUTY FIRE MARSHAL Route 50 was open only to emergency vehicles Monday, as Hurricane Sandy brought with her a large amount of rain that flooded the downtown area.PHOTO COURTESY ROBERT KORB JR., WORCESTER COUNTY DEPUTY FIRE MARSHALWORCESTER COUNTY

Residents throughout Worcester County started picking up the debris Tuesday that had been left behind by Hurricane Sandy, but compared to other areas, damage was slight.

County officials lifted the state of emergency and closed all county shelters Tuesday when it was clear that Sandy was no longer a threat. Residents who evacuated were authorized to return to their homes, but in some areas, roadways remained impassable because of standing water, fallen trees or other debris left behind by Sandy as she intensified and blew north.

During the storm, Worcester County Public Works crews worked until the winds reached a sustained force of 40 mph and went back out again after the winds died down.

After Sandy had come and gone, roads that remained impassable included the southern section of Route 113 south of Snow Hill, which was closed in both directions because of high water and the roadway at the Route 12 bridge in Snow Hill, also because of high water.

 While the sky looks menacing, the worst was over when this photo of Ocean City was taken Tuesday from Route 50. PHOTO COURTESY GINA WHALEY While the sky looks menacing, the worst was over when this photo of Ocean City was taken Tuesday from Route 50.PHOTO COURTESY GINA WHALEYA sinkhole on Route 346 between Route 610 and Hall Road near Whaleyville caused a closure that is expected to last several days while a 70-inch pipe is repaired.

Bud Church, president of the Worcester

County Commissioners, had minor damage at his West Ocean City residence. A tree fell on his house. A number of houses in the Cape Isle of Wight area had water inside and some trees toppled to the ground because of a combination of wind and the wet ground.

The situation in South Point was worse.

“Three people lost parts of their property,” Church said.

 A pontoon boat drifted away during the storm and came to a stop in vegetation alongside Old Landing Road in north Ocean City. OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL A pontoon boat drifted away during the storm and came to a stop in vegetation alongside Old Landing Road in north Ocean City.OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELLOne property owner also lost his entire septic system. Piers and docks were also demolished in the South Point area.

During the storm, 143 people were sheltered at Stephen Decatur High School, 68 people and 45 pets stayed at Stephen Decatur Middle School, 15 people stayed at Snow Hill High School and 77 people and two pets stayed at Pocomoke High School. Two pets stayed at Animal Control. Altogether, the county provided shelter for 305 people and 49 pets.

The county Health Department set up an emergency hotline, but discontinued it Tuesday afternoon at 5 p.m. Public Works crews worked during the bad weather and immediately afterward, but many county employees were off work Monday and Tuesday and could stay off work Wednesday because liberal leave was in effect. Schools were also closed for three days.

 A wayward personal watercraft and an outboard motor boat rest in back yards of residences on Jamestown Road on Wednesday, following days of high winds and heavy rain brought on by Hurricane Sandy. OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL A wayward personal watercraft and an outboard motor boat rest in back yards of residences on Jamestown Road on Wednesday, following days of high winds and heavy rain brought on by Hurricane Sandy.OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELLAs Assateague Island National Seashore, camping closed Saturday at 11 a.m. and the park closed Sunday at noon and was scheduled to remain closed at least through Tuesday. Then park personnel expected to assess when it could reopen. They needed to determine the condition of the Verrazano Bridge to Assateague.

In Ocean Pines on Tuesday morning, residents were asked to remain in their homes for a few more hours. Crews were assessing damage at daybreak that day. The wind advisory was still in effect and residents were warned that trees could still fall because of the soggy ground conditions. Abnormally high water levels were still evident.

Initial evaluations showed buildings and other structures held up well during Sandy. The Clubs, Aquatics and Recreation and Parks remained closed Tuesday, but Ocean Pines crews removed more than 30 trees from the roadways. Residents were advised to take their storm debris to the Public Works facility near the South Fire Station. Only yard debris is acceptable.

Ocean Pines General Manager Bob Thompson said volunteers assisted the employees before, during and after the store.

“We will be back up and running at full speed tomorrow,” Thompson said in an email message to residents.

In Ocean Pines, which is served by Choptank Electric Cooperative, not a single residence lost electricity during the duration of the storm.

Elsewhere in the county, 2,264 Choptank customers had outages as of 10:15 a.m. Tuesday morning. The cooperative expected to have power restored by late that day to some areas and expected to restore power to the other areas by Wednesday morning.

In Berlin, some residents lost power twice, once for two hours and once for two-and-a-half hours.

At the peak of the storm, more than 71,000 customers of Delmarva Power were out of service. As of 11 a.m. Wednesday, slightly more than 8,600 customers in Maryland and Delaware remained without power.

“We were very fortunate in Berlin,” said Councilwoman Lisa Hall, who was one of the Berlin residents who lost power, on Tuesday. “We had a few limbs down, and older trees down, but they didn’t fall on houses. No one was injured and I think we made out very well.”

Hall rode around town to check out the situation first-hand.

“We had flooding in the usual areas, but it wasn’t as bad a it has been,” she said.

Areas flooded during the day Monday and then the water receded. When high tide returned, the water level did not get as high as it had during the previous high tide.

Flooding, Hall said, was worse in August when she had 13 inches of rain in her yard in eight hours. During Sandy, she had 10.5 inches of rain, but it was during a longer period of time, so the effect was not damaging.

The town of Berlin cancelled its Monday recycling collection and rescheduled it for Monday, Nov. 5. It also cancelled the Tuesday trash collection and rescheduled it for Wednesday, Oct. 31.

Ocean Pines, which is served by Choptank Electric Cooperative, did not have any power outages.

On Gum Point Road in Taylorville, resident Charlotte Powell walked down the road to check for damage and there was little, if any, damage to see, although she did not survey the entire length of the road because of high water. She said a tree fell on a shed and water was in yards, but that was about the extent of the damage. Water reached the deck on one house, but did not get into the house.

“We were very lucky,” she said.

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