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  1. #61
    MoSh
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    they could legalize gambling in ocean city not that many places are going to re-model their building to incorperate gambling it would cost a helluva lot of money.

  2. #62
    DianeR
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    What exactly is your point?

    Uh, breathe, and please use punctuation so maybe we can figure out exactly what your point is. I can't tell if you're for gambling or against it. And I don't really care if that's how you talk on IM. This isn't AIM. If you want to be seen as having a intelligent position, at least try not to mangle the english language.

    Either way, renovation is necessary or you'll have buildings being condemmed and falling down. How attractive would that be?

    All those buildings in OC are owned by individuals or groups that decided to take the risk and invest in property in OC. I think it's their right to sell or renovate their property, since they do own it. As long as approval is given by approriate authorities, the law is being followed.

  3. #63
    Senior Member Z06RL's Avatar
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    Just re reading this thread. It was beginning to sound like the war against the states again. It isn't just "northerners" with attitudes. A lot of attitude is caused by non communication with the thousands of non english speaking help in the area. And talk about attitude! I was right behind a Russian student employee at Marshalls and she STOLE a walkman right in front of the cashier. The security alarm went off as she walked out the door and they did nothing about it. The cashier said to me "Why bother. They have such an attitude it's more work and trouble to catch them." Bad attitudes abound in OC. I say, just keep to yourselves, enjoy it while you're there. Wonder why it is that there are so few Marylanders who actually WORK in OC in the summer.

  4. #64
    olive
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    Shantytown

    Quote Originally Posted by DianeR
    I agree with you, obviously, since you agreed with me. Be careful about the NY/NJ thing. There's a few posters here from there. I myself grew up in PG county, MD (my parents choice) even though I now live in No. VA and have been going to OC for a long time. People from NY and NJ come down because it's a cleaner, safer family vacation spot. And they do bring quite a bit of money down as you can tell by the jewelry they wear and cars they drive.

    45th street shops will be no loss. They were falling down and didn't have much to offer. Shantytown was one of those places people went because it was there, not really to buy anything.

    Keno is around and not really a problem since it is limited. I think the fear is of full blown casinos like Atlantic City, which comes back to the NY/NJ connection. That's one place they avoid because it's become such a non-family vacation spot.

    OC will constantly change just like any other city.


    I have to disagree with you about Shantytown. Most of the shops in Shantytown were specialty shops. You could go in most of those shops and find souvenirs other than the same old t-shirts, keychains and shot glasses. Although in the end, the eateries were closed, at one time they were a nice place to have a drink or a bite to eat while shopping out of the madness of the boardwalk. It had an atmosphere all it's own. We always went to Shantytown, not just because "it was there", but because we liked walking through what resembled a quaint little fishing village and being able to shop without pushing through a crowd of people or being followed through the store with a foreign shopworker breathing down your neck because they thought you were going to steal from them. I, along with many other people feel the same and miss that place.

  5. #65
    Senior Member Z06RL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olive
    I have to disagree with you about Shantytown. Most of the shops in Shantytown were specialty shops. You could go in most of those shops and find souvenirs other than the same old t-shirts, keychains and shot glasses. Although in the end, the eateries were closed, at one time they were a nice place to have a drink or a bite to eat while shopping out of the madness of the boardwalk. It had an atmosphere all it's own. We always went to Shantytown, not just because "it was there", but because we liked walking through what resembled a quaint little fishing village and being able to shop without pushing through a crowd of people or being followed through the store with a foreign shopworker breathing down your neck because they thought you were going to steal from them. I, along with many other people feel the same and miss that place.
    There are a lot of tourists who agree with you. Me included. I happen to be of the opinion that it is little quaint places like this that give towns some character and charm. Yes it was extremely weathered and run down, but that was part of its appeal. Instead of tearing it down, I wish they could have fixed it up. However, some of the die hards will give you grief about the necessity for closing Shanty Town. The sad part is, they tore it down, and just planted trees. Guess it's going to be a park for the wealthy homeowners along the bay. Sad.

  6. #66
    songbird
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    The O.C. of my youth

    I was brought to O.C. the year I was born, 1950. My Aunt lived at 2nd Street and I spent my entire summers with her and my Grandmother. During the 1950's and early 1960's, O.C. just about ended at 33rd Street with nothing north of that except some shacks, a few bars, and a house here and there. "Coastal Highway" was a two lane road and I believe we called it the beach highway. The tallest hotel back then was the George Washington on 10th Street, where the Americana now sits, (formerly The Mirage).

    My Aunt was a dancing teacher, so I got to know the local kids and their parents who were business owners, for the most part. When my Aunt took me down the boardwalk, it was in my best dress and white patent leather shoes. We'd go to the Bandshell to hear a concert with Mr. Sacca, who had played with Sousa, conducting. Maybe afterward, we'd go to Torpey's Carmel Crisp and "Mr. Jack" would reach into the candy case and pull out a piece of fudge and give it to me. Sometimes my older cousin would take me to the movies at The Capitol or Showell's and I can remember leaving that theatre on a Saturday night and having the aroma of "Ernie's Donuts" make my mouth water as we reluctantly walked home empty handed. Money was not abundant in those days for a treat such as a glazed donut. I made money searching for empty pop bottles that we could return to the store for a few cents up to a nickle.

    My first job was at Fisher's Pharmacy behind the fountain. Hires Root beer in a frosted mug was always a popular drink there. On Sunday mornings, we sold a lot of Bromo Seltzers to the men with hangovers. Next year, I worked at Dolle's. Everyone worked who lived there. It was hard work, long hours, not much pay, but it was good experience for my whole life. I've always showed up on time and worked hard at every job I had after that.

    Do I like the changes? No. We hadn't been to O.C. since summer of 2000. We were in O.C. the week of 10/10 - 10/17/2004, mainly to visit my Aunt who is now in a nursing home nearby. I could hardly believe how high the Stowaway Grand is. I don't like the high ones along the bay, either. When we went downtown to do Marty's Playland and Thrasher's, I took a walk along Baltimore Avenue and couldn't believe the changes there, either. The Adelphia Restaurant that my friend's family owned and took a lot of pride in looks so honky tonk. Rayne's, which was opened year round and was THE best place to get a crab cake in O.C. for many years, is now a "Subway." They even ripped out the marble fountain.

    I remember when "Motel Row" was built along the ocean side between 15th Street and 33 rd Street in the 1950's - early '60's. Miami is restoring their old motels, O.C. just knocks them down. O.C. needs a Historic Archetecturial Review Board, like our town has. All the old time lights or stamped concrete or pavers aren't going to do it entirely. Setbacks and landscaping should be enforced. Hotels are building right up to their property lines making it impossible for the next door neighbor to do maintenance on their properties. Some of the changes O.C. as seen over the years aren't all bad. I do think the Commander did an excellent job with the new building. That Paradise Inn on 9th Street reminds me of a big iced cake.

    I think this post is too long and I've probably bored all of you with my reminiscing. I just miss the O.C. of my youth very much. We now vacation at a place on the Jersey Cape where the building height is strictly limited to 40 feet. It's all homes, with just a few motels, (low ones), at the southern end. Jersey can do this because it has many seaside towns. One for high hotels and gambling, one a dry town, one for amusments, etc. Which reminds me, I'm going to hope and pray that gambling does not come to O.C. I hope it stays a family town, with more good restaurants.

  7. #67
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    what a great post.i share many of the same thoughts.

  8. #68
    intheknow
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    Quote Originally Posted by DianeR
    Either way, renovation is necessary or you'll have buildings being condemmed and falling down. How attractive would that be?

    All those buildings in OC are owned by individuals or groups that decided to take the risk and invest in property in OC. I think it's their right to sell or renovate their property, since they do own it. As long as approval is given by approriate authorities, the law is being followed.

    I agree completely. Even though I am negatively affected by it, it is well within their right to do so. I would do the same in their situation, no reason to hate. Then again, I am a free market capitalist and most people tend to be quasi-socialist.

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