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  1. #111
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    Re: Ocean City History Books

    I saw that the Life Saving Station Museum Gift Shop is now selling a reprint of "The Tides of March" a book published in 1962 about the storm that hit OC in March of that year.

    [img width=300 height=468]http://www.ocmuseum.org/images/uploads/Tides_of_March_thumb.JPG[/img]

  2. #112
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    Re: Ocean City History Books

    Interesting book. Wonder if they have any of those lots left. I'd be willing to spring for the ocean front corner lot for $250!

  3. #113
    Senior Member OCGuy's Avatar
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    Fenwick Island Ice Age to Jet Age

    [img width=500 height=680]http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7071/7327108944_d54a963abb_c.jpg[/img]

    Fenwick Island Ice Age to Jet Age

    By Mary Pat Kyle

    Published by Sea Shell City, 1995, 80 pages

    This book is available for $9.98 at Sea Shell City in Fenwick Island.



    This is an interesting book focused on Ocean City's northern neighbor. It was written almost 20 years ago to capture the memories of many of the people who were there in the early days of Fenwick Island. Although it focuses on the area north of the state line, it covers the area from about 110th Street in OC to northern FI. It is a series of accounts on different topics, with most write ups only abut a page long.



    As the title suggests, the book covers Fenwick Island from its geologic formation through the early 1990s. It has sections on Native American inhabitants of the area, the survey of the southern Delaware boundary along the Transpeninsular Line, the early settlement of Fenwick, the lighthouse, the 1930s and World War 2 era, and the storms that impacted the area. In several passages the differences between Fenwick Island and Ocean City are noted, often with great information that provides context for how these differences emerged. A primary driver was the lack of transportation to Fenwick, while Ocean City became connected to a railroad line early in its history.



    Paul and Dorthy Pepper, who I believe owned a set of cottages in the northern end of Ocean City in the 1940s to 1960s, are interviewed for several sections of the book. They founded the society that preserves the Fenwick Island Lighthouse, and Paul Pepper's great grandfather was the third lighthouse keeper. There is a nice writeup on the lighthouse. It was first lit on August 1, 1859. It was built on the highest point of land in the area and is 87 feet tall with a third order Fresnel lens. Such lens systems are typically about 40" in inner diameter and 4' 8" tall. Its light originally burned whale oil and was designed to be visible 15 miles out to sea.



    In the 1930s there were three distinct settlements of vacationers in this area. South of the state line was "Maryland Beach," north of the state was "Delaware Beach," and north of that in the areas north of Atlanta Street (now Atlantic) in Fenwick Island was "Pittsburgh Beach," because many of its early occupants came from Pittsburgh. In the 1920s and 1930s there were no real streets, no electricity, no sewage, and no pubic services. The only way to Fenwick was on a rough road that required getting across "The Ditch" near where Harpoon Hanna's is today. In 1939 Coastal Highway was extended to the Delaware line, but there was no road between Fenwick and Bethany. The cottages built along the beach north of the state line were on state owned property. They were small cottages that could be moved easily. In 1941 Delaware allowed people to purchase these lots for a price of $200 for an ocean front lot, $250 for ocean front corner lots, and $100 for lots that were not ocean front. Lots were about 50 by 150 feet (0.17 acres). Given the lack of infrastructure, many people thought the lots were overpriced!



    There is an interesting section on perhaps north Ocean City's most famous early inhabitant, Zippy Lewis. From 1825 into the 1840s (perhaps later) she lived in the area where the Carousel now stands. She was the widow of a sea captain. She had five children and subsisted on what she found on the beach and the livestock she raised. She was rumored to have amassed a treasure chest full of gold and silver coins that she found washed up after various wrecks and storms.



    The book includes a nice bibliography of sources, which provides a basis for finding other interesting material on the area.



    The book includes lots of drawings, photos, reprinted newspaper articles, and maps from several eras. Overall it is an interesting book about the north end of Ocean City and Fenwick Island. I recommend it, particularity if you have an interest, or perhaps have property, in this area.

  4. #114
    Senior Member PlainsPricey106's Avatar
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    Re: Ocean City History Books

    Awesome articles OC guy. I love reading about the history of Ocean City. I have recently started my own collection of OC books. Do you know of any books about the fishing industry in OC? Thanks and keep up the good work.

  5. #115
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    OC and Fenwick Island - books relating the history

    Interesting post, I'm curious to read the book. I hear a lot about early Ocean City and Fenwick Island from my Grandma (how life used to be when most of the residents were squatters, etc), but also, Dot & Paul Pepper were my great aunt and uncle - they had the cottages long after the 60s cos I was born in 1978 and they ran those cottages for most of my life (thus far) as well. Through the 90s for sure. My Grandma also self published a book called 'Growing up in the Thirties and Beyond' that talks about a lot of the history of the area. It's in the Selbyville and Millsboro libraries.

    Quote Originally Posted by OCGuy View Post
    [img width=500 height=680]http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7071/7327108944_d54a963abb_c.jpg[/img]

    Fenwick Island Ice Age to Jet Age

    By Mary Pat Kyle

    Published by Sea Shell City, 1995, 80 pages

    This book is available for $9.98 at Sea Shell City in Fenwick Island.



    This is an interesting book focused on Ocean City's northern neighbor. It was written almost 20 years ago to capture the memories of many of the people who were there in the early days of Fenwick Island. Although it focuses on the area north of the state line, it covers the area from about 110th Street in OC to northern FI. It is a series of accounts on different topics, with most write ups only abut a page long.



    As the title suggests, the book covers Fenwick Island from its geologic formation through the early 1990s. It has sections on Native American inhabitants of the area, the survey of the southern Delaware boundary along the Transpeninsular Line, the early settlement of Fenwick, the lighthouse, the 1930s and World War 2 era, and the storms that impacted the area. In several passages the differences between Fenwick Island and Ocean City are noted, often with great information that provides context for how these differences emerged. A primary driver was the lack of transportation to Fenwick, while Ocean City became connected to a railroad line early in its history.



    Paul and Dorthy Pepper, who I believe owned a set of cottages in the northern end of Ocean City in the 1940s to 1960s, are interviewed for several sections of the book. They founded the society that preserves the Fenwick Island Lighthouse, and Paul Pepper's great grandfather was the third lighthouse keeper. There is a nice writeup on the lighthouse. It was first lit on August 1, 1859. It was built on the highest point of land in the area and is 87 feet tall with a third order Fresnel lens. Such lens systems are typically about 40" in inner diameter and 4' 8" tall. Its light originally burned whale oil and was designed to be visible 15 miles out to sea.



    In the 1930s there were three distinct settlements of vacationers in this area. South of the state line was "Maryland Beach," north of the state was "Delaware Beach," and north of that in the areas north of Atlanta Street (now Atlantic) in Fenwick Island was "Pittsburgh Beach," because many of its early occupants came from Pittsburgh. In the 1920s and 1930s there were no real streets, no electricity, no sewage, and no pubic services. The only way to Fenwick was on a rough road that required getting across "The Ditch" near where Harpoon Hanna's is today. In 1939 Coastal Highway was extended to the Delaware line, but there was no road between Fenwick and Bethany. The cottages built along the beach north of the state line were on state owned property. They were small cottages that could be moved easily. In 1941 Delaware allowed people to purchase these lots for a price of $200 for an ocean front lot, $250 for ocean front corner lots, and $100 for lots that were not ocean front. Lots were about 50 by 150 feet (0.17 acres). Given the lack of infrastructure, many people thought the lots were overpriced!



    There is an interesting section on perhaps north Ocean City's most famous early inhabitant, Zippy Lewis. From 1825 into the 1840s (perhaps later) she lived in the area where the Carousel now stands. She was the widow of a sea captain. She had five children and subsisted on what she found on the beach and the livestock she raised. She was rumored to have amassed a treasure chest full of gold and silver coins that she found washed up after various wrecks and storms.



    The book includes a nice bibliography of sources, which provides a basis for finding other interesting material on the area.



    The book includes lots of drawings, photos, reprinted newspaper articles, and maps from several eras. Overall it is an interesting book about the north end of Ocean City and Fenwick Island. I recommend it, particularity if you have an interest, or perhaps have property, in this area.

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