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  1. #1
    moberry
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    Days Inn Oceanfront???

    How is this hotel.... My DH made reservations here for a week in July and I read on another forum that is wasn't that nice.... Dirty, etc.....


  2. #2
    JPiccolo
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    My husband and I stayed there two years ago in a pool side room. We thought it was pretty nice. The room we were in was a bit small though, because of its location. We were on the ground, and our room was just next to the outdoor bar at the gate to one of the two pools.

    I know we had a clean room too, but that was our experience. Overall, it was a good place to stay. We haven't been there since only because we found a place that's a bit cheaper and just as much to our liking.

  3. #3
    JustBeachy`
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    We've stayed there before, a couple years ago in July and again for Sunfest weekend. We had an oceanfront room that was very clean and up to date. We loved people watching from the balcony. No complaints.

  4. #4
    gustavenla68
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    Stay away from the place...

    There was an article in the harrisburg paper about 2 people dieing from carbon monoxide poisoning there. They had quotes from another women who stayed there the week before and left because it was dirty and they felt unsafe.

    http://www.pennlive.com/news/patriot...070.xml&coll=1

  5. #5
    Senior Member Z06RL's Avatar
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    Yes, two people died, and the hotel is closed for now:

    OCEAN CITY -- Investigators determined carbon monoxide killed a father and daughter Tuesday at a resort motel, while the mother and daughter have recovered from the poisoning.

    However, the State Fire Marshal's Office still had not pinpointed the source of the leak Wednesday afternoon.

    Kelly Boughter, 10, and her father, Patrick Boughter, 40, of Lebanon, Pa., died due to carbon monoxide intoxication, according to the Medical Examiner's Office in Baltimore, but police refused to release the names of the 36-year-old mother and 7-year-old daughter who survived the incident.

    Ocean City police spokesman Barry Neeb said both had been treated in hyperbaric chambers in Maryland's Shock-Trauma unit and released on Wednesday.

    When dozens of emergency services personnel responded to the Days Inn at 23rd Street for an unknown medical emergency at around 2 p.m. Tuesday, crews quickly realized a gas leak might be responsible, according to Deputy Fire Marshal Dave Hartley.

    Hartley said crews measured significantly high carbon monoxide readings in the motel's basement and in the room where the two deaths occurred, and said the two rooms adjacent to that room had dangerously high readings while readings up to the third floor either above or adjacent to that room had notably high readings.

    Carbon monoxide detectors were not in the rooms, nor are they required by state or town law, said Steve Price, Ocean City Volunteer Fire Company spokesman.

    While the Fire Marshal's Office hasn't identified what led to the high carbon monoxide levels, Hartley said the office is investigating the possibility that emissions from the motel's boiler may have been venting into the affected areas as well as other heat-producing equipment.

    "We're looking at all the equipment that may produce carbon monoxide, but we're not ready to make a determination as to what caused (the leak)," Hartley said, mentioning that washers, dryers, central heating units and hot water heaters could all cause high levels of the gas.

    Days Inn owner Charles "Buddy" Jenkins purchased the motel five years ago and recently added two floors to the building where the deaths occurred, but Hartley said his office did not believe any ventilation issues associated with those new floors were at fault.

    A Days Inn employee said the evacuated motel building that faces the Boardwalk was still empty today and that there was no set date to begin filling the rooms with patrons again.

    Hartley said the Days Inn would not be able to reopen the building until it had checked all carbon monoxide producing equipment and made 100 percent sure it was in working order.

    The carbon monoxide did not seem to affect anyone beyond the Boughter family, however, as Worcester County Health Department Director of Nursing Becky Shockley said it had received no calls from anyone expressing symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning, and that any health risk from the gas would have quickly abated after the building was evacuated Tuesday around 2:30 p.m.

    Owners of the Days Inn -- the Boardwalk Hotel Group -- released a two paragraph statement expressing sympathies to those affected by the evacuation and condolences to the Broughter family.

    Some of the evacuated guests in the oceanfront building have had to fend for themselves.

    Doris McGee of Baltimore said she was thrown outside with her 18-month-old baby for hours with no diapers, baby food or answers.

    "They closed the whole section off. We had to find someplace else for ourselves," McGee said. "Only thing the Days Inn said is that we won't charge you for last night and we'll allow you to break from your current stay at no charge.

    "It took hours to get our luggage. They told us it would be a few minutes before we got in, then it was hours, then more hours, and we wanted to get baby formula and diapers," McGee said. "Then (police) demanded we get our stuff and get out and they were banging on the door every five seconds yelling to get out."

    The Days Inn assisted one woman arriving in Ocean City today who had reservations there by placing her in the Howard Johnson that Boardwalk Hotel Group also owns.

  6. #6
    beachlvr2448
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    I stayed at the days inn about 4 yrs ago in an effeciency with my parents and my brother and his family....I thought it was one of the nicest,cleanest hotels that i've stayed at....and in the 30 years i've been going there I've spent time at several different hotels.

  7. #7
    moberry
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    I guess they have re-opened.... But to do so, per the health dept., they had to install CO2 detectors and smoke alarms in the whole hotel and the basement...
    Still to freaky for me....

  8. #8
    NY-MD
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    Days Inn carbon monoxide leak

    I believe you would use a CO detector for carbon monoxide and a CO2 detector for carbon dioxide. The problem at the Days Inn was reported to be CO, carbon monoxide.


    As reported the hotels are under no requirement by state and local law to install CO detectors. If the health department can require this installation in the Days Inn why not in all OC hotels and condos?


    Did they find the source of the gas leak?

    I would still think twice about visiting this hotel.

  9. #9
    NY-MD
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    Officials Continue To Probe Carbon Monoxide Tragedy
    Shawn Soper

    News Editor

    07/06/2006 OCEAN CITY – The investigation continues this week into the tragic deaths of two Pennsylvania tourists, who succumbed to carbon monoxide intoxication at a Boardwalk hotel last Tuesday, but the groundwork is already being laid for a multi-level fact-finding mission to ensure it does not happen again.

    Patrick Boughter, 40, and his daughter Kelly, 10, perished last week at the Days Inn on 22nd Street after carbon monoxide from an as-yet-unidentified source, seeped into their hotel room. Yvonne Boughter and another daughter, Morgan, 7, were transported initially to Atlantic General Hospital before being sent to Shock Trauma in Baltimore, where they were treated and released.

    The first evidence of a potential problem began early in the morning last Tuesday when Yvonne Boughter awoke to find herself, her husband and their two children with various symptoms such as headache, nausea and dizziness around 1 a.m. Yvonne Boughter told a Pennsylvania newspaper last week she first realized something was wrong with her family in the early morning hours and recalls making a call to 911, but it remains uncertain if the call was placed and when.

    While it remains unclear if and when Boughter made the early morning 911 call, another potential opportunity to avert the tragedy is known to have occurred at around 9:30 a.m., when occupants of two hotel rooms adjacent to the Boughters called 911 reporting similar symptoms. Four people from those rooms were taken to AGH where they were treated and released.

    It was not until shortly before 2 p.m. on Tuesday when Ocean City Emergency Services, including the police department, the volunteer fire company, paramedics and representatives of the Worcester County Health Department responded en masse to the Days Inn for what was initially characterized as a potential propane gas leak. What emergency officials quickly learned was that a carbon monoxide leak from an unidentified source had caused the death of two individuals and left at least two other extremely ill.

    The investigation into the source of the fatal carbon monoxide continues this week. Ocean City Emergency Services Director Joe Theobald said this week no further details about the incident would be released until a thorough investigation has reached its conclusion.

    “We’re still evaluating and investigating this tragic incident,” said Theobald. “We certainly don’t want to rush to a conclusion. We’ll make sure we have very complete information before we fully disclose the results of our investigation.”

    While the investigation into the particular incident continues, town officials are already exploring ways to help ensure it doesn’t happen again.

    Smoke detectors have long been required in public accommodations, but carbon monoxide detectors remain strictly voluntary. The issue of mandating carbon monoxide detectors has surfaced off and on for several years. Just this year, a pair of cross-filed bills in the Maryland General Assembly that would have mandated carbon monoxide detectors under certain conditions failed to make it out of their respective committees, but last week’s tragic incident in Ocean City is providing the impetus for state and local officials to take a closer look at the issue.

    Delegate Jim Mathias said this week the appropriate local agencies including the Mayor and Council, the Fire Marshal’s Office, Emergency Services, NFPA, the Ocean City Volunteer Fire Company and even the Ocean City Chamber of Commerce and Hotel/Motel/Restaurant Association are already putting their collective heads together to determine if there is a plausible solution.

    “The Fire Marshal’s Office and all of the appropriate agencies and authorities are huddling on this right now,” Mathias said. “The first step, obviously, is to determine what happened with this particular incident, and from that, we can start to determine what preventative measures would be sensible and practical.”

    Mathias said a practical and reasonable solution would likely emerge from those discussions.

    “After all of the information is collected and disseminated, we’ll determine what, if any, action is appropriate. It could come in the form of a local ordinance on the town or county level, or it could require some action on the state level.”

    Mathias said, should the brainstorming sessions determine action on the state level is the best way to address the issue, he would gladly champion the cause in Annapolis if he is elected in November.

    “I would gladly take the lead on this if it is determined some action on the state level is necessary,” he said. “I’m going to listen to their discovery and we’ve offered any and all assistance we can. If it is determined some action on the state level is appropriate, I would gladly take the lead on that.”

    Should the multi-agency discussions determine a local approach might be more appropriate in the form of a local ordinance or amendment to the building codes, the Mayor and Council would likely take the lead on the issue.

    “We are absolutely going to take a close look at this,” said Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan. “It has surfaced before. There was a bill addressing this issue in the General Assembly in this year’s session and I’m not sure what happened to it, but I know we’re going to revisit this. After we put together the sequence of events with this particular situation, we should be able to determine what direction we want to go in with this.”

    Meehan said Ocean City’s top priority has always been public safety, which is reflected in the town’s building codes, which are among the most stringent in the state.

    “We take this very seriously,” he said. “We meet or exceed all of the state and federal codes. If there is something we need to do to make Ocean City a safer place, we will obviously do that. Public safety is always our top priority.”

    Mathias agreed, saying the town, unlike other municipalities, always applies changes in building codes to older buildings.

    “Ocean City has the distinction of being one of the few, if not the only, municipalities, that considers retrofitted buildings with its ordinances in terms of building codes,” he said. “As a host community with hundreds of older buildings, we have to do it that way. Many places apply changes in building codes to only new construction.”

    For his part, Theobald said the town’s emergency services department would take an active role in determining what if any action should be taken with regards to carbon monoxide detectors.

    “Carbon monoxide detectors save lives,” he said. “We’ll learn what we can from this and take any and all action we need to do to make sure it doesn’t happen again. Ocean City considers public safety its number one priority and I’m sure we’ll evaluate what happened with this particular incident and use that information to ensure we are doing everything we can do.”

  10. #10
    NY-MD
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    Better Process Needed

    Editor:

    My thoughts and prayers go out to Mrs. Boughter and Megan. I personally do not know them but was also, on vacation at the Days Inn when they were there.

    I had two rooms, one floor above them, two rooms over, rooms 216 and 218, ocean front. My family and I were able to leave together, thank God. We also had my 22-month-old grandson with us. I am also grateful that we left on Tuesday morning to visit the wild ponies but when we got back at 1:30 p.m., that is when they pulled up with an ambulance.

    My point with writing this is: The health department or anyone, for that matter, would not tell us anything. We were just told to leave our rooms, with the clothes on our back. Hours later my husband, three hours away, heard about the deaths on our local news channel and told me to cancel my stay at the hotel. He told me to find another hotel which I did. But during check out and during the wait to get our belongings, not one person told us what kind of symptoms to look for or if we should get checked out. According to the newspaper, the health department said that the reading were still really high on the second and third floor, close to the Boughters' room. And, of course, we were right there. We, all, experienced headaches, were tired and my one daughter was sick to her stomach for two days. Had we known, we would have been at a hospital. Once we returned home, the baby went to the doctor, just to reassure me and he is fine, thank God.

    I don't know if I should contact the health department and let someone know the lack of help and information that was available for the patrons that may have been exposed. I hope that they get organized and if this should happen again, hopefully they can save a life and ease the others involved.

    Gail Moreland

    Accokeek

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